bli

bli

I’m a bioinformatician, mostly programming in Python and writing automated data analysis workflows with Snakemake. I was interested in programming since a teenager (in the 1990’s), but actually didn’t write more than two small Turbo Pascal programs before learning Python during my PhD (in the mid 2000’s). I installed my first “alternative” OSes in 2004 on a G3 iMac (Debian, Yellowdog, Darwin, OpenBSD, Ubuntu, Gentoo) and stayed with Linux since then (Gentoo, then Funtoo at home, Ubuntu variants at work).

I heard about Rust last year during a job interview. I had mentioned that I wanted to learn Haskell or C/C++ to be able to make faster programs, and one of the interviewers suggested I learn Rust instead. Since then, I’ve started looking at the book, but it didn’t get further than that.

Lately, after being confronted with a few mysterious bugs on my Ubuntu workstation, I’ve been annoyed by my lack of knowledge in operating systems. I started reading “Modern Operating Systems” by Andrew Tannenbaum, read about BSD systems, ended up watching the Haiku and Redox video interviews by Bryan Lunduke, and tried to run Redox in qemu. After a few trials I could get it work this morning, which is encouraging. I haven’t figured out yet how to navigate using the browser (apart from clicking on links), how to ssh to other machines, how to install programs, how to edit files, so I guess I will have to be patient before eventually being able to use it “for real”.

I don’t think I have the skills nor the time to contribute, but I wish Redox a long life will because this project looks interesting. I hope that Redox will eventually be usable on various hardware, including “old” machines (I’m referring to my almost 10 years old Thinkpad T61 here), won’t get bloated, and will keep enough similarity at the user level with other Unix-like systems, so that its potential user base be large.